Weird Animal Monday: Bioluminescent Octopus

The adhesive suckers on the female are all the same size while the ones on the male vary in size.

I’ve seen this image a few times and decided to find out a little more about this amazing looking octopus. This is the Bioluminescent Octopus, scientifically known as: Stauroteuthis syrtensis. It is found in the North Atlantic Ocean, at extreme depths that range from 500 to 4,000 m. It has eight tentacles that are unequal in length, the longest extending to about 14 in., and they are joined by two webs, which gives it its umbrella-like shape. There are a total of about 60 adhesive suckers on each arm, 40 of which are modified to emit a blue-green light, known as photophores. It is believed that the function of these photophores is as defense, to scare off predators, and to also lure small crustaceans, its primary diet. The texture is gelatinous (as you would expect), and it is reddish-brown and translucent (you can see its organs through its skin!).

I’ve always been amazed by deep-sea creatures, the mystery of what we haven’t discovered yet has always interested me. Unfortunately this creature is so rare there are no videos of it. The known information is known only from a few gathered specimens.

Source: OurBreathingPlanet

 

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